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Written by Lee Child – Jack Reacher, once a major in the US Military Police and now a drifter, is on a bus. That it is not unusual for Reacher. He doesn’t own a car or carry a suitcase, and when his clothes wear out he just buys new ones. Along with him on the bus are[...]

CIS: A guide to the Martin Beck series

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Between 1965 and 75, the husband and wife team of Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö (above) wrote a series of 10 police procedurals set in Stockholm, all carrying the subtitle ‘The Story of a Crime’. Their work was distinct from other crime fiction at the time due to the attention given to the personal lives of[...]

Crossing the Line

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Written by Frédérique Molay, translated by Anne Trager – If your tastes tend towards the gory and you enjoy your crime set in a foreign clime, then this could be the book for you. Molay is the holder of a slew of international crime fiction awards and has been described as the French Michael Connelly, so[...]

CIS: All about Bloomsbury Reader

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Crime Fiction Lover is very pleased to bring you Classics in September – a month of good old crime books – with the support of Bloomsbury Reader. Advertising on our site and providing us with great prizes for you on Facebook, Bloomsbury Reader is the ideal partner for our classic-themed month because the folks there[...]

Rose Gold

Rose Gold

Written by Walter Mosley – It is the mid 1960s and in Los Angeles black folks have, to a degree, been replaced by young political activists and hippies as the biggest perceived threat to the white middle classes – and the LAPD. Even so, PI Ezekiel ‘Easy’ Rawlins is surprised when he receives a visit[...]

CIS: The Devil at Saxon Wall

The Devil At Saxon Wall

Written by Gladys Mitchell – First published by Grayson & Grayson in 1935, The Devil at Saxon Wall was the sixth book in Gladys Mitchell’s Mrs Bradley Mysteries. Beatrice Adelaide Lestrange Bradley made her debut in the 1929 novel, Speedy Death, and made a total of 66 appearances before taking her final bow in 1984.[...]

CIS: Lost classics by Arthur Lyons

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All too often when I cite Arthur Lyons (1946-2008) as one of my favourite crime writers I am met with a blank expression or something like: ‘Who? Never heard of him…’ Likewise, when I was researching some background material for this article, there was a dearth of information on the author. Sadly, his back catalogue[...]

Reykjavik Nights

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Written by Arnaldur Indridason – Following the teasing, ambiguous and melancholy end to Strange Shores – which is said to be the final novel in the Erlendur series – Reykjavik Nights doesn’t tell us what happened to our hero. Instead, it’s a prequel to the existing series of Erlendur books which are all detailed here.[...]

CIS: My classics by Cathy Ace

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Not only is Cathy Ace the author of the wonderful Cait Morgan Mystery series, but she’s also the Vice President of the Crime Writers of Canada. That means she’s quite a busy lady, so we were definitely the lucky ones when she agreed to join us here for Classics in September and share her five[...]

Ghosts of Manhattan

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Written by George Mann – First published by an independent in 2010, Mann’s tribute to the Pulp-era American rogue crime-fighting vigilantes has been revised, expanded and released by Titan Books. It’s been given an exceptional new pulp-style cover too, created by design studio Amazing 15. The year is 1927, prohibition is in force and America[...]

Stranger at Sunset

Strangers At Sunset

Written by Eden Baylee – Psychiatrist Dr Kate Hampton takes a vacation in Jamaica, staying at the luxury resort Sunset Villa. It’s gated off against the wilder criminal elements of the Caribbean island, but all is not well. The owners of Sunset Villa, Nolan and Anna Pearson, have two problems. One – which is solvable[...]

CIS: The Quiller Memorandum revisited

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In 1965, writing under the pseudonym of Adam Hall, Elleston Trevor published a thriller which, like Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale before it, was to herald a change in the world of spy thrillers. The novel was titled The Berlin Memorandum and at its centre was the protagonist and faceless spy, Quiller. The setting is Cold War-divided Berlin where[...]

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