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DavidPrestidge

DavidPrestidge has written 360 posts for Crime Fiction Lover

William Wallace writes crime

On the Radar — There’s more than just a touch of tartan among this week’s new releases. We have gore in Glasgow, an emergency in Edinburgh, anarchy in Alloa, and even an author called William Wallace. Meanwhile, away from the bonny land we’ve got sin in Sacramento, killings in Kassel, savagery in Somerset and a bloodbath in[…]

Aloysius Tempo

Written by Jason Johnson — Aloysius Tempo was brought up hard. His mother, uncertain of which side of the Irish political divide his father came from, abandoned him a few days after his birth. She left him beside a stream, his cradle a plastic beer crate. From that inauspicious entry into the world, things went[…]

Dexter’s requiem?

On the Radar — Doesn’t it make you sick when the killer gets away at the end? Well, there’s one killer we’ve all been rooting for a long time and, paradoxically, it makes us a bit sick that Dexter is not going to get away at the end of the eighth novel in Jeff Lindsay’s[…]

Gargoyle Pixie Dog

Written by Bill Todd — This collection opens with the bright and breezy novella, Gargoyle Pixie Dog. Private detective Danny Lancaster, who features in all the stories, is a partly disabled army veteran plying his trade on the streets of Brighton. The seaside town offers a backdrop of fading Georgian splendour, gay subculture, drugs and antique shops.[…]

The Big Bitch

Written by John Patrick Lang — So, what is left of Jackson ‘Doc’ Holiday’s world, now that his multi-million dollar fraud scheme has collapsed around his ears? Well, there’s the Armani suits, Gucci loafers and handmade shirts, for starters. A total pariah in the legitimate financial world, what does he do? He becomes a San Francisco[…]

Dem bones

On the Radar — This week the Bones series by Kathy Reichs receives its latest instalment, and we’ve also got a brand new book by Denise Mina. There’s a wartime crime story, a couple of Irish connections and a trip to Malmo as well. See what you think of this week’s new releases… Speaking in[…]

What Remains

Written by Tim Weaver — David Raker has joined the select band of fictional characters whose return in a new book excites existing fans, and collects new ones with every publication. Raker finds people. People who may not want to be found, but have left loved ones and family searching for the truth, whatever it[…]

Victoria Iphigenia… sounds good

On the Radar — Chicago investigator VI Warshawski has the two most beautiful and mellifluous forenames in the history of crime fiction but as her countless fans know she is tough as teak. She returns this week in Brush Back. We also offer a detective who might be a carrot, a couple of books set in the[…]

First look: Every Night I Dream of Hell

Ever since Malcolm Mackay burst onto the scene with The Necessary Death Of Lewis Winter (2013), a new novel by the Stornaway writer has become a major crime fiction event. An early copy of the latest has arrived and I love the look of the new cover – suitably stark and uncompromising, suiting a writer to[…]

The Ends of the Earth

Written by Robert Goddard — This is the concluding part of a trilogy set in the immediate aftermath of World War I. James ‘Max’ Maxted is a former RAF pilot who has been searching for the truth behind the death of his diplomat father in Paris. In his quest he has become embroiled in an[…]

Familiarity, no contempt

On the Radar — Several long-standing favourite characters make a reappearance here in our new releases this week including Frieda Klein, Bruno Courrèges, ‘Max’ Maxsted, and Peter Diamond. There are also new books by Karin Slaughter, Brian McGilloway, Cathi Unsworth and – with another Bob Dylan song title – Kay Kendall. Friday on My Mind by Nicci[…]

Are You Watching Me

Written by Sinéad Crowley — Liz Cafferkey works at Tír na nÓg in Dublin. In Gaelic it means The Land of The Young, a place in pre-Christian Irish myth. That’s ironic because in reality Tír na nÓg is a shabby drop-in centre for elderly men. They serve cups of tea and sympathy, and try to help with problems[…]